2015

Cosmopolitan and Karma Nirvana launch the first national Day of Memory on 14th July 2015 in London. The event was supported by government officials and The Henry Jackson Society who used it as a platform from which to launch their report titled ‘Britain’s Forgotten Women: speaking to survivors of honour abuse’.

Research found that of the individuals questioned in occupations such as teaching, policing, nursing and social working, 75% revealed honour-based abuse had never been covered in their training. Over two-thirds were not told what to do if they come across a potential victim, with only 8% stating they ‘definitely’ know the signs to look for in a victim.

“We hope to make a real change by launching the Day of Memory. Shafilea Ahmed sought help from statutory organisations including social services and teachers but was repeatedly sent home to her family, who took her life. People don’t want to offend communities or individuals or be called racist, but culture is no excuse for abuse. Training for professionals is critical.”Jasvinder Sanghera CBE

“So-called ‘honour-based’ violence is a terrible form of abuse, with victims often betrayed by the very people who are supposed to protect and care for them. I commend Karma Nirvana and Cosmopolitan for holding the first National Day of Memory for Victims of Honour Killings” Home Secretary Theresa May